And shake it all loose…

You know when you’ve just finished your step or aerobics class (way back in the day, when I actually did something other than running after a baby for exercise!), and they tell you to “take a deep breath, and shake it all loose”? – Well, that’s what I need to do weaving-wise. Something with “no-stress” attached.

It’s been a hell of a month, quite literally. My dad had a heart attack while staying with us here in Spain (a huge shock to everyone, not least of all himself – but thank God for the Barcelona emergency services and Spanish public health system – How in the name of all that is Holy, can the richest country in the world even be debating the possibility of a public health service?? ), Hannah decided that she was waking up for a feed every 2.5 – 3 hours and was sleeping in our bed again, work just heated up and  we’re waiting for our mortgage to be re-evaluated…yup “take a deep breath, and shake it all loose”

A wee bit of linen and pure wool double cloth with pockets of cotton thrums. It’s been a while since I did anything for the fun of it, or to “see what happens when you wash it”, but this has been good, relaxing therapy.

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The (Linen) bit in the middle

Well, after what seems like “my year of wool” (in fact it was only 4 months!), I knew I’d be heading for a reaction, and it came in the form of linen last weekend. Out with the winter wool, and in with the spring linen.


I wanted to do something relatively quick and satisfying, so I put on a shortish warp of pure linen, and the results are now on Etsy – 3 pure linen and 5 cotton and linen wash mitts. They really feel beautiful, the mix of linen and honeycomb weave gives a lovely texture, while the cotton ones have a gorgeous warmth to them.
I’ve pointed out to my husband that there’s not a bit of “green” in sight!
The truth is, I used to hate weaving with linen, but I learnt by trial and error that so long as the linen warp has at least 2 ply and a good twist, it can be as fine as sewing thread and it will not break. A little patience with the tension and a big damp tea towel draped across the shed and you can handweave metres without one flaw. Nothing like learning the hard way to get the gist of something!